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Milk-derived Protein Boosts Wound Healing Process

Milk-derived Protein Boosts Wound Healing Process Casein, dairy, milk, R&D Food and Beverage Business

A groundbreaking study conducted by University College London researchers and published in the Journal of The Royal Society Interface has revealed the potential of casein, a protein found in cow’s milk, to accelerate wound healing. This discovery opens up new possibilities for utilizing casein as an inexpensive alternative to silver or other commonly used wound-dressing materials.

To investigate its effectiveness, the researchers developed a bandage-like polymer by combining casein with a biodegradable polyester called PCL. They then conducted experiments on 32 adult rats with induced diabetes and small skin perforations. The rats were divided into three groups: a control group with no treatment, a group treated with standard bandages, and a group treated with casein-infused fibers. The progress of wound healing was closely monitored and documented on different days throughout the testing period.

The results were remarkable, with the group treated with casein-loaded fibers exhibiting the greatest reduction in wound area. In fact, nearly complete regeneration of the wounds was observed within the 14-day testing period. In comparison, the control group and the group treated with normal bandages only showed decreases in wound area to 45.6 ± 5.7% and 31.1 ± 10.8% respectively, indicating slower healing.

The researchers concluded that the casein-loaded fibers provided the most optimal wound healing conditions, while the group treated with normal bandages also showed better results compared to the control group. They noted that by day 14, the wounds in the casein group were almost completely reepithelialized and significantly more covered compared to the control group’s wounds.

Furthermore, embedding casein in the fibers was identified as one of the most effective forms of wound healing material. The combination of casein’s anti-inflammatory properties with fibrous materials produced using PCL allows for regulation of humidity and supports gas exchange during the healing process. This innovative bandage design simplifies wound healing procedures.

“This work demonstrates the effectiveness of casein, a highly abundant and inexpensive protein, as a wound healing material that can enhance the healing process. Further research should explore the potential of casein in providing antibacterial protection,” concluded the researchers.

Source:

Casein fibres for wound healing
Ahmed, J, et al
Published: 26 July 2023
DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2023.0166

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A breakthrough study by University College London researchers recently published in the Journal of The Royal Society Interface has uncovered the remarkable potential of casein, a protein extracted from cow’s milk, to accelerate wound healing. This exciting discovery has significant implications for the medical industry, potentially offering an affordable alternative to traditional wound-dressing materials such as silver.

With a focus on producing cost-effective solutions, the researchers successfully developed a bandage-like polymer composed of casein and a biodegradable polyester called PCL. To assess its efficacy, the team conducted experiments on 32 adult rats with diabetes, where small skin perforations were induced. These rats were divided into three groups: a control group receiving no treatment, a group treated with standard bandages, and a group treated with casein-infused fibers. The researchers closely monitored and photographed the healing process on days 0, 3, 7, 10, and 14.

The results were highly promising, with the group treated with casein-loaded fibers displaying the most substantial reduction in wound area. In fact, nearly complete regeneration of the wounds was observed within the 14-day testing period. In comparison, the control group and the group treated with traditional bandages showed slower healing, reaching wound area reductions of only 45.6 ± 5.7% and 31.1 ± 10.8%, respectively.

Drawing robust conclusions from their findings, the researchers determined that the casein-loaded fibers provided the most optimal conditions for wound healing. Additionally, the group treated with traditional bandages showed better results compared to the control group. By day 14, the wounds in the casein group were nearly fully reepithelialized and significantly more covered when compared to the control group’s wounds.

Furthermore, the incorporation of casein into the fibers was identified as one of the most effective methods of utilizing this protein for wound healing. The combination of casein’s anti-inflammatory properties with fibrous materials produced using PCL allows for efficient regulation of humidity and gas exchange, facilitating the healing process. This innovative approach to bandage design simplifies wound healing procedures, offering improved outcomes for patients.

“This work demonstrates the effectiveness of casein, an abundant and cost-efficient protein, as a wound healing material that enhances the healing process. Further studies should explore the potential of casein in providing antibacterial protection,” concluded the researchers.

Source:

Casein fibers for wound healing
Ahmed, J, et al
Published: 26 July 2023
DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2023.0166

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